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Finding our way back

A resource for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples after a suicide attempt. 

Finding your way back

Getting your life back on track after attempting suicide is not easy. It takes time to recover physically and emotionally. The information below should not be taken as medical advice but a starting point for working through some of the questions that can come up after a suicide attempt. It also offers ideas about what may assist you in regaining a sense of control. 

Free School Resources

The Black Dog Institute offers a range of free evidence-based educational resources, designed for teachers, young people and parents. These school resources can help secondary educators with building mental health and wellbeing education into their curriculum, and include online interactive short-courses for students and ready-to-use classroom activities. 

Friends and family - Mental health

If a young person develops mental health issues it is important that they get help early. These resources contain information designed to help friends and family better understand mental health and what you can do to support young people who might be going through a tough time.

Going Upstream: A Framework for Promoting the Mental Health of LGBTI People

Going Upstream: A Framework for Promoting the Mental Health of LGBTI People provides a framework that aims to specifically guide the development and implementation of strategies for the promotion of mental health and wellbeing and prevention of mental health problems in LGBTI Australians.

Guidelines for Integrated suicide-related crisis and follow-up care in Emergency Departments and other acute settings

These guidelines are based on the input of people with a lived experience of suicide and leading clinicians. They aim to help those working in acute settings to inform service planning, better equip and support staff to work effectively with those at risk of suicide, and guide empathetic, compassionate responses to people experiencing a suicidal crisis. 

Guiding their way back

Having someone you care about attempt suicide can be an incredibly traumatic experience. You might respond with anger, fear or sadness. You might also find yourself asking questions; many of them beginning with 'why'. It is natural to have many different feelings, thoughts and concerns and to not know what to do or say. This resource is a starting point for working through some of the questions that can come up after a suicide attempt. 

Having a conversation with someone you are worried about

Heads up: Better mental health in the workplace

The Heads Up website contains information and resources for better mental health and suicide prevention in the workplace.